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Welcome to Shanghai International Studies University

Chinese Media & Global Corporate Communication
- General Information

    Program Overview

    Globalization has made this world a true “global village,” characterized by growing impacts of global media to all the spheres of our human life. All the villagers of this “global village” are being influenced by global media and their interaction with the respective societies.

    This program aims to develop you intellectually as well as enhance your professional skills. You will explore global media systems and their political and economic and cultural relationship with different societies around the world.

    The program will have a core module on global media, which you will gain an overview of the contemporary landscape of global media by drawing on multi-disciplinary approaches of social and technological development. You will explore the powerful role of ideas, beliefs and values in media production and consumption. By engaging with theory and research you will develop your understanding of the historical, social and political contexts in which the media industries are located and the academic debates revolving around such concepts as global news flows, cosmopolitanism, connectivity and the emergence of new social and cultural forms which are no longer tied to territorial nation-states and hierarchical power relations between nations.

    The program will also host a public communication module in which you have a chance to explore how global media models have helped communication in various countries (particularly inside China) for global entrepreneurship in terms of public relations, global advertising and global cultural issues. You will examine and participate in the process of content creation and distribution and develop your understanding of the role of strategy and planning, based on practices in China.  You can learn how to communicate strategically for business and cultural purposes and think more critically, by tapping into the sphere of global communication and by finally involving yourself into the major Media Project in Shanghai or at your home country.

    Curriculum

    Basic Courses (three courses, 8 credits)

    Chinese Language (Level 1, Level 2)
    Culture and Media in China
    GMS Major Courses (five courses, 10 credits)
    Globalization, Social Development & Media
    Public Relations and e-Media Practice
    Advanced Writings for Media
    Communications Ethics and Regulation
    Research Methods and Applications
    GMS Elective Courses (three courses, 6 credits, four courses required for a MA Report)
    Data Analysis and Public Opinion
    Comparative Media Systems
    Media Relations Management
    Communication Strategies
    Entrepreneurship, Innovation & Change Management
    Marketing Communications
    Leadership & Organizational Communication

    Media Project: 2 credits (internship including new media project)

    MA Thesis: 6 credits

    Total Courses required: (32 credits)

    Course descriptions, including recommended books, general or specific course objectives, course topics, and “substantive rationales” (drawn from international recommendations for postgraduate degree programs in public relations), follow below.

    1. Core Course: Chinese Language (Level 1, Level 2)

    Course Description: Students will begin to learn basic Mandarin Chinese.

    Textbook(s) and/or Other instructional materials:

    To be determined

    Course Objectives:
    *Students will begin learning Mandarin Chinese.

    Specific Topics Covered by Course (may or may not mirror textbook[s]):
    *Students will begin learning Mandarin Chinese.

    Substantive Rationale:
    Students will begin to learn Mandarin Chinese for possible future professional positions representing international or global companies in China, and/or for communicating with Chinese business leaders, government officials, and others who live in and visit other countries. Learning some basic Chinese also will assist students while they are living and attending postgraduate school in Shanghai.


    2. Core Course: Culture and Media in China

    Course Description: Students will be introduced to traditional and modern Chinese culture, with emphasis on current trends and issues. Chinese media will be analyzed through focus on the CCTV (national television), state-run Xinhua news agency, official and market-oriented newspapers, representative magazines and movies, and social media (Weibo, Wechat, etc.). Students will also explore availability of foreign culture/media in China, and Chinese culture’s representations and image in other countries.

    Possible Textbook(s) and/or Other instructional materials:

    Recommended Chinese Culture books (choose one):

    The Cambridge Companion to Modern Chinese Culture, by Kam Louie (Cambridge University Press, 2008; 424pp, $31.99)

    Encountering the Chinese: A Modern Country, An Ancient Culture, by Hu Wenzhong, Cornelius N. Grove, and Zhuang Enping (Intercultural Press, 2010; 224pp, $24.95)

    China A to Z: Everything You Need to Know to Understand Chinese Customs and Culture, by May-lee Chai and Winberg Chai (Plume, 2007; 304pp, $16)

    China: Its History and Culture, 4th Ed., by W. Scott Morton & Charlton M. Lewis (McGraw-Hill, 2014; 368pp., $19.95)

    Recommended Chinese Media books (choose one or two):

    Changing Media, Changing China, by Susan L. Shirk (Oxford University Press, 2010, 288pp, $49.50)

    Impact of Globalization on the Local Press in China: A Case Study of the Beijing Youth Daily, by Shixin Ivy Zhang (Lexington Books, 2014; 156pp, $80).

    Two Billion Eyes: The Story of China Central Television, by Ying Zhu (New Press, 2012, 304pp., $19.31)

    Media Commercialization and Authoritarian Rule in China, by Daniela Stockmann (Cambridge University Press, 2012, 358pp., $95)

    How the Market is Changing China’s News: The Case of Xinhua News Agency, by Xin Xin (Lexington Books, 2012, 175pp., $80.00)

    Possible Suppplemental Books on Chinese Media:

    Investigative Journalism in China: Journalism, Power, and Society, by Jingrong Tong (Continuum, 2012, 280pp., $32.16)

    Investigative Journalism in China: Eight Cases in Chinese Watchdog Journalism, by David Bandurski (Hong Kong University Press, 2010, 192pp., $22.03)

    China’s Environment and China’s Environment Journalists, by Hugo de Burgh and Zeng Rong (Intellect, 2012, 103pp., $35.50)

    Chinese Investigative Journalists’ Dreams: Autonomy, Agency, and Voice, by Marina Svensson, Elin Saether, Zhi’an Zhang and Hongyi Bai (Lexington Books, 2013, 238pp., $75.36)

    Specific Course Objectives (adapted from Commission on Public Relations Education in its Educating for Complexity Recommendations, October 2012):
    *Understanding the major historical, political, social/cultural, and technological reasons for the past and current roles of mass media (including journalism, advertising, and the related role of public relations) and social media in China.
    *Understanding how public relations, journalism, and advertising are practiced and studied in China, and the differences and similarities that exist between China and other countries.
    *Having knowledge of major public relations, journalism, advertising, and other media-oriented theories, approaches and schools of thought developed or adapted by China.
    *Recognizing that social, political, economic, and cultural factors have altered media practices in China.
    *Appreciating cross-cultural and intercultural communication influences on mass and social media in China.

    Specific Topics Covered by Course (may or may not mirror textbook[s]):
    *Traditional Chinese culture and Chinese modern culture
    *Chinese news production & content, including investigative journalism, Xinhua, etc.
    *Chinese media industry structure, size, scope
    *Role of Chinese journalists/internal (Party/state) influences on them
    *Relationship between Chinese and foreign media/journalism
    *Chinese news media, other Chinese mass media, and the market economy
    *Chinese entertainment TV production & content (game shows, reality shows, talent shows)
    *Beijing 2008 Olympics and the media
    *Professionalization and ethics of Chinese journalists
    *China’s higher education in journalism, public relations, advertising, marketing, public diplomacy

    Substantive Rationale: Commission on Public Relations Education in its Educating for Complexity recommendations (October 2012), included in its overall conclusions about expectations of professional master’s degree programs in public relations that they include, “improved critical thinking and problem solving skills” (p. 6).

    Commission on Public Relations Education in its Educating for Complexity recommendations (October 2012), included in its overall conclusions about expectations of academically-oriented master’s degree programs in public relations that they include: “advanced critical thinking skills” (p. 6).

    Commission on Public Relations Education in its Educating for Complexity recommendations (October 2012) also concluded that “employers suggested that they usually hired people who understood the management of public relations and not just the tactics of public relations....Advanced positions in public relations involved setting strategy based on an understanding of client needs, the client’s competition and the specific business settings....[E]mployers emphasized business knowledge. They also were less concerned about public relations knowledge and skills than they were about the individual traits of potential hires, such as critical thinking ability, intellectual capability and curiosity....They suggested making the [master’s degree] programs rigorous and selective.”

    Commission on Public Relations Education in its Educating for Complexity recommendations (October 2012) recommended that a public relations master’s degree’s core curriculum include “global influences on the practice of public relations” (p. 12), and that “Global influences on the Practices of Public Relations” on the “following topics and issues should be present to meet the demands of rapidly growing public relations practice: *Understanding reasons for varying definitions of public relations, strategic communication and communication management in different parts of the world. *Understanding how social, economic, political and cultural dimensions influence how public relations is practiced. *Understanding how public relations is practiced and studied in different parts of the world and the differences and similarities that exist. *Having knowledge of major public relations theories, approaches and schools of thought developed in Europe, the Americas, Asia and Australia. *Appreciating how cultural distinctions and socio-economic and political particularities influence public relations practice in different regions and countries throughout the world. *Recognizing that social, political, economic and cultural factors may alter public relations practices, even within one country. *Appreciating how advanced global public relations theories can be used and applied in strategic decision making. *Appreciating cross-cultural and intercultural communication influences on public relations globally. *Understanding relationship-building and relationship management across national and regional borders.”



    3. Major Course: Globalization, Social Development & Media

    Course Description: Students will learn the history and current forms of globalization, with its economic, political, scientific/technological, and cultural dimensions. The “positive” and “negative” causes and effects of globalization, with different results by country, industry, and social class, will be weighed. Students will analyze various claims about globalization to understand to what extent they are accurate and not hype. Students also will learn how mass media play a central role in both globalization and understanding, and misunderstanding, of what it is and its effects.

    Textbook(s) and/or Other instructional materials:

    Globalization and Media: Global Village of Babel, by Jack Lule (Rowman & Littlefield, 2011, 188 pp. $27.95)

    New Media, Development and Globalization: Making Connections in the Global South, by Don Slater (Polity, 2013, 242pp., $24.95)

    Possible Supplemental Book

    Globalization and the BRICs: Why the BRICs Will Not Rule the World For Long, by Francesca A. Beausang-Hunter (Palgrave Macmillan, 2012, 232pp., $100)

    Specific Course Objectives (adapted from Commission on Public Relations Education in its Educating for Complexity Recommendations, October 2012):

    *Understanding reasons for varying definitions and roles of public relations, journalism, advertising, media technologies, media companies, and related government agencies and civil society organizations in different parts of the world.

    *Understanding how social, economic, political and cultural dimensions influence how public relations and journalism are practiced.

    *Understanding how public relations and journalism are practiced and studied in different parts of the world and the differences and similarities that exist.

    *Having knowledge of major mass communication and media theories, approaches and schools of thought (including both public relations and journalism) developed in Europe, the Americas, Asia, and Australia.

    *Appreciating how cultural distinctions and socio-economic and political particularities influence public relations, journalism, and other media-related practices in different regions and countries throughout the world.

    *Recognizing that social, political, economic, and cultural factors may alter public relations and journalism practices, even within one country.

    *Appreciating how advanced global public relations, journalism, and other media-related theories can be used and applied in strategic decision-making.

    *Appreciating cross-cultural and intercultural communication influences, globally, on public relations, journalism and other aspects of media.

    *Understanding relationship-building and relationship management across national and regional borders.

    Specific Topics Covered by Course (may or may not mirror textbook[s]):

    *History of globalization in current and earlier forms
    *Differing definitions globally of “globalization” and “development”
    *Economic globalization, with emphasis on China
    *Political globalization, with emphasis on China
    *Cultural globalization, with emphasis on China
    *Positive and negative results of globalization for various countries, regions, industries, economic classes
    *Central role of mass and social media in globalization

    Substantive Rationale: Commission on Public Relations Education in its Educating for Complexity recommendations (October 2012), included in its overall conclusions about expectations of professional master’s degree programs in public relations that they include, “An appreciation for the importance of globalization” (p. 5), “an understanding of the role of communication in society and the ethical challenges of global public relations” (p. 5), and “improved critical thinking and problem solving skills” (p. 6).

    Commission on Public Relations Education in its Educating for Complexity recommendations (October 2012), included in its overall conclusions about expectations of academically-oriented master’s degree programs in public relations that they include: “Thorough knowledge of public relations theories and principles” (p. 6), “advanced critical thinking skills” (p. 6), “Skills to teach undergraduate public relations” (p. 6), and “Preparation to enter and succeed in public relations doctoral programs” (p. 6).

    Commission on Public Relations Education in its Educating for Complexity recommendations (October 2012) also concluded that “employers suggested that they usually hired people who understood the management of public relations and not just the tactics of public relations....Advanced positions in public relations involved setting strategy based on an understanding of client needs, the client’s competition and the specific business settings....[E]mployers emphasized business knowledge. They also were less concerned about public relations knowledge and skills than they were about the individual traits of potential hires, such as critical thinking ability, intellectual capability and curiosity....They suggested making the [master’s degree] programs rigorous and selective.”

    Commission on Public Relations Education in its Educating for Complexity recommendations (October 2012) recommended that a public relations master’s degree’s core curriculum include “global influences on the practice of public relations” (p. 12), and that “Global influences on the Practices of Public Relations” on the “following topics and issues should be present to meet the demands of rapidly growing public relations practice: *Understanding reasons for varying definitions of public relations, strategic communication and communication management in different parts of the world. *Understanding how social, economic, political and cultural dimensions influence how public relations is practiced. *Understanding how public relations is practiced and studied in different parts of the world and the differences and similarities that exist. *Having knowledge of major public relations theories, approaches and schools of thought developed in Europe, the Americas, Asia and Australia. *Appreciating how cultural distinctions and socio-economic and political particularities influence public relations practice in different regions and countries throughout the world. *Recognizing that social, political, economic and cultural factors may alter public relations practices, even within one country. *Appreciating how advanced global public relations theories can be used and applied in strategic decision making. *Appreciating cross-cultural and intercultural communication influences on public relations globally. *Understanding relationship-building and relationship management across national and regional borders.”


    4. Major Course: Public Relations and e-Media Practice (including web analytics and online community management)

    Course Description: This course integrates both tried-and-true PR methods and tactics, and cutting-edge PR practices, with the current opportunities to use the WorldWideWeb for national, international, and global public relations (and advertising) processes. Students will learn public relations applications of all major social media, plus new or unique legal, ethical, and technological aspects of online public relations. Also covered is how to assess effectiveness of new and current PR practices through social media analytics, search engine optimization, and social media monitoring.

    Possible Textbook(s) and/or Other instructional materials:

    Public Relations books (choose one):
    New Rules of Marketing & PR: How to Use Social Media, Online Video, Mobile Applications, Blogs, News Releases, and Viral Marketing to Reach Buyers Directly, by David Meerman Scott (Wiley, 2013, 464pp., $24)

    Share This: The Social Media Handbook for PR Professionals, by Chartered Institute of Public Relations (Chartered Institute of Public Relations, 2012, 264 pp., $28)

    Social Media and Public Relations: Eight New Practices for the PR Professional, by Deirdre K. Breakenridge (Pearson FT Press, 2012, 176pp., $26.99)

    Likeable Social Media: How to Delight Your Customers, Create an Irresistible Brand, and Be Generally Amazing on Facebook, by Dave Kerpen (McGraw-Hill, 2011, 272pp., $22).

    Web Analytics books (choose one):
    Optimize: How to Attract and Engage More Customers by Integrating SEO, Social Media, and Content Marketing, by Lee Odden (Wiley, 2012, 256 pp., $24.95)

    How to Measure Social Media: A Step-by-Step Guide to Developing and Assessing Social Media ROI, by Nichole Kelly (Que Publishing, 2012, 288pp., $24.99)

    Social Media ROI: Managing and Measuring Social Media Efforts in Your Organization, by Olivier Blanchard (Que Publishing, 2011, 350pp., $24.99).

    Measure What Matters: Online Tools for Understanding Customers, Social Media, Engagement, and Key Relationships, by Katie Delahaye Paine (Wiley, 2011, 272pp, $27.95)

    Social Media Analytics: Effective Tools for Building, Interpreting, and Using Metrics, by Marshall Sponder (McGraw-Hill, 2011, 336pp., $32).

    Mining the Social Web: Data Mining Facebook, Twitter, LinkenIn, Google+, GitHub, and More, 2nd Ed., by Matthew A. Russell (O’Reilly Media, 2013, 448pp., $44.99).

    General Course Objectives (adopted from Commission on Public Relations Education in its Educating for Complexity Recommendations, October 2012):
    *“Relationship management. Students should understand the characteristics of publics, distinctions between publics and communication audiences, types of publics, the concept of opinion leaders and the stages of development of publics” (from the Commission on Public Relations Education in its Educating for Complexity recommendations, October 2012, p. 12).
    *“Strategic public relations best practices in a digital environment: This area should familiarize students with ways in which digital and social media are transforming the practice of public relations, including their incorporation into public relations programs and campaigns, and their use in environmental scanning, informing and persuading publics and building dialogic relationships between organizations and their publics” (from the Commission on Public Relations Education in its Educating for Complexity recommendations, p. 12).
    *“Written and oral communication. Students should be able to...apply appropriate writing styles for specific media....” (from the Commission on Public Relations Education in its Educating for Complexity recommendations, p. 13).
    *“Persuasive communication techniques. Students should understand the historical roots of persuasion; theories about persuasive communication from disciplines such as social psychology; and concepts such as cognitive dissonance, selective attention and retention, ethos, pathos and logos, message sources (including credibility, charisma and control), message content and propaganda” (from the Commission on Public Relations Education in its Educating for Complexity recommendations, p. 13).
    *“Management of an organization’s communication functions. This area should include management of people, programs and resources, as well as communication with an organization’s leadership” (from the Commission on Public Relations Education in its Educating for Complexity recommendations, p. 13).

    Specific Topics Covered by Course (may or may not mirror textbook[s]):
    *Brand awareness & lead generation
    *Web’s disruption of advertising
    *Web’s new dimensions of public relations
    *Convergence of marketing and PR on the Web
    *Facebook, Wikis, Listservs, Twitter, LinkedIn, Google+, etc.
    *Blogs & online thought leadership
    *Audio, video, YouTube, podcasts
    *Global websites
    *Mobile marketing
    *Instagram, Pinterest, etc.
    *The New Media Relations, press releases, website newsrooms, etc.
    *Search engine-based marketing
    *Apps
    *Social media and the law, social media and ethics (internally and externally)
    *Social media analytics, optimization, social media monitoring

    Substantive Rationale: Commission on Public Relations Education in its Educating for Complexity recommendations (October 2012), included in its overall conclusions about expectations of professional master’s degree programs in public relations that they include, “An appreciation for the importance of...entrepreneurship and technology in today’s business environment” (p. 5), “improved critical thinking and problem solving skills” (p. 6), “social science research and evaluation knowledge and skills” (p. 6), and “cutting-edge communication management abilities” (p. 6).
    Commission on Public Relations Education in its Educating for Complexity recommendations (October 2012), included in its overall conclusions about expectations of academically-oriented master’s degree programs in public relations that they include: “Thorough knowledge of public relations theories and principles” (p. 6), “advanced critical thinking skills” (p. 6), “social science research skills to test new theories” (p. 6), “Skills to work in applied public relations research” (p. 6), “Skills to teach undergraduate public relations” (p. 6), and “Preparation to enter and succeed in public relations doctoral programs” (p. 6).
    Commission on Public Relations Education in its Educating for Complexity recommendations (October 2012) more specifically said, “Even the most recommended corollary courses outside of public relations had a management component:...digital media....” (p. 9)
    Commission on Public Relations Education in its Educating for Complexity recommendations (October 2012) also concluded that “employers suggested that they usually hired people who understood the management of public relations and not just the tactics of public relations....Advanced positions in public relations involved setting strategy based on an understanding of client needs, the client’s competition and the specific business settings....[E]mployers emphasized business knowledge. They also were less concerned about public relations knowledge and skills than they were about the individual traits of potential hires, such as critical thinking ability, intellectual capability and curiosity....They suggested making the [master’s degree] programs rigorous and selective.”
    Commission on Public Relations Education in its Educating for Complexity recommendations (October 2012) recommended that a public relations master’s degree’s core curriculum include “*Strategic public relations management *Basic business principles and processes” (p. 12).
    Commission on Public Relations Education in its Educating for Complexity recommendations (October 2012) recommended that a public relations master’s degree’s curriculum also include “*Relationship management....[and] Strategic public relations best practices in a digital environment” (p. 12).



    5. Major Course: Advanced Writings for Media
    (speeches, annual corporate reports, employee newsletters, customer newsletters, etc.)

    Course Description: Students will learn principles behind, and skills for, writing speeches for corporate, government, and NGO officials; and writing/editing press releases, press conference statements, annual reports, employee and customer newsletters, website content, YouTube video scripts, Twitter/WeChat posts, letters to the editor and other feedback to media, and other communications prepared and distributed by organizations for dissemination to target audiences and/or the general public.

    Possible Textbook(s) and/or Other instructional materials:

    Speechwriting books (choose one):
    10 Steps to Writing a Vital Speech: The Definitive Guide to Professional Speechwriting, by Fletcher Dean (CreateSpace Independent Publishing, 2011, 120pp., $39.95)

    Speechwriting: The Expert Guide, by Simon Lancaster (Robert Hale, 2011, 288 pages, $19.95)

    Speech Right: How to Write a Great Speech, by Chuck Snearly (Aventine Press, 2010, 184pp., $12.50)

    Writing/Newsletter books (choose one):
    Business Writing with Heart: How to Build Great Work Relationships One Message at a Time, by Lynn Gaertner-Johnston (Syntax Training, 2013, 436pp, $24.95)

    The Magic of Newsletter Marketing: The Secret to More Profits and Customers for Life, by Jim Palmer (Success Advantage Publishing, 2009, 210pp, $19.95)

    Newsletter Marketing: Insider Secrets to Using Newsletters to Increase Profits, Get More New Customers, and Keep Customers Longer than You Ever Though Possible, by Shaun Buck (CreateSpace Independent Publishing, 2013, 136pp, $9.95)

    General Course Objectives (adopted from Commission on Public Relations Education in its Educating for Complexity Recommendations, October 2012):
    * “Critical thinking. This area should include the elements of reasoning involved in critical thinking, such as identification of purpose; the question at issue; assumptions, implications, and consequences; and information, concepts, conclusions and point of view” (from the Commission on Public Relations Education in its Educating for Complexity recommendations, p. 13).
    *“Written and oral communication. Students should be able to...apply appropriate writing styles for specific media....” (from the Commission on Public Relations Education in its Educating for Complexity recommendations, p. 13).
    *“Persuasive communication techniques. Students should understand the historical roots of persuasion; theories about persuasive communication from disciplines such as social psychology; and concepts such as cognitive dissonance, selective attention and retention, ethos, pathos and logos, message sources (including credibility, charisma and control), message content and propaganda” (from the Commission on Public Relations Education in its Educating for Complexity recommendations, p. 13).

    Specific Topics Covered by Course (may or may not mirror textbook[s]):
    *Writing speeches for corporate, government, and NGO officials
    *writing/editing press releases and press conference statements
    *Writing/editing annual reports, employee and customer newsletters, website content, YouTube video scripts, Twitter/WeChat posts, letters to the editor and other feedback to media
    *Writing/editing any and all other communications prepared and distributed by organizations for dissemination to target audiences and/or the general public.

    Substantive Rationale: Commission on Public Relations Education in its Educating for Complexity recommendations (October 2012), included in its overall conclusions about expectations of professional master’s degree programs in public relations that they include, “improved critical thinking and problem solving skills” (p. 6), and “cutting-edge communication management abilities” (p. 6).
    Commission on Public Relations Education in its Educating for Complexity recommendations (October 2012), included in its overall conclusions about expectations of academically-oriented master’s degree programs in public relations that they include: “advanced critical thinking skills” (p. 6), and “Skills to teach undergraduate public relations” (p. 6).
    Commission on Public Relations Education in its Educating for Complexity recommendations (October 2012) more specifically said, “Participants reaffirmed the need for a mastery of language in oral and written form and agreed that a master’s degree curriculum needed to include instruction in the skills of...persuasive writing....Even the most recommended corollary courses outside of public relations had a management component:...journalism....” (p. 9)
    Commission on Public Relations Education in its Educating for Complexity recommendations (October 2012) also concluded that “employers suggested that they usually hired people who understood the management of public relations and not just the tactics of public relations....Advanced positions in public relations involved setting strategy based on an understanding of client needs, the client’s competition and the specific business settings....[E]mployers emphasized business knowledge. They also were less concerned about public relations knowledge and skills than they were about the individual traits of potential hires, such as critical thinking ability, intellectual capability and curiosity....They suggested making the [master’s degree] programs rigorous and selective.”



    6. Major Course: Communications Ethics and Regulation
    (including corporate social responsibility, corporate governance, crisis            communication and risk communication)

    Course Description: This course is designed for students to learn about media law (constitutional, statutory and regulatory) in the USA and other major countries. Content will focus on the historical/cultural context for media regulation, and the advantages and disadvantages of current media law/statutes/regulations. Students will also learn how major ethics theories/philosophies from around the world are applied to mass communication (especially news media, social media, public relations, and advertising). Content will include both case studies and ethics codes, examined separately and in conjunction with each other.

    Possible Textbook(s) and/or Other instructional materials:

    Law Books (choose both):
    The Global Advertising Regulation Handbook, edited by Mary Alice Shaver and Soontae An (M.E. Sharpe, 2013, 272pp, $49.95).

    Global Internet Law in a Nutshell, 2nd Edition, by Michael L. Rustad (West, 2013, 640pp, $41.00)

    Ethics books (choose one):
    Global Media Ethics: Problems and Perspectives, edited by Stephen J.A. Ward (Wiley-Blackwell, 2013, 340pp, $46.95)

    Ethical Issues in International Communication, edited by Alexander G. Nikolaev (Palgrave Macmillan, 2011, 264pp, $95.00)

    NEWThe Handbook of Global Communication and Media Ethics, edited by Robert S. Fortner and P. Mark Fackler (Wiley-Blackwell, 201?, XXXpp., $XXX.XX).

    Supplemental Law books:
    Regulating Social Media: Legal and Ethical Considerations, by Susan J. Drucker and Gary Gumpert (Peter Lang, 2013, 243pp, $38.95)

    International Libel and Privacy Handbook: A Global Reference for Journalists, Publishers, Webmasters, and Lawyers, 3rd Edition, by Charles J. Glasser Jr (Bloomberg Press, 2013, 592pp, $75).

    Supplmental Ethics book:
    Advertising Ethics, by Edward Spence and Brett van Heekeren (Pearson, 2004; 160pp, $50.35)

    Global Journalism Ethics, by Stephen J.A. Ward (McGill Queens University Press, 2010, 296pp., $29.95)

    General Course Objectives (adopted from Commission on Public Relations Education in its Educating for Complexity Recommendations, October 2012):
    *“Ethical issues, which should include classical theories of ethics, profit maximization vs. corporate social responsibility and current public relations codes of ethics” (from the Commission on Public Relations Education’s recommendations in Educating for Complexity, October 2012, p. 12).
    *Legal issues affecting the practice of public relations. Students should understand global (including China) trends, patterns and variations in rights and regulations of speech and press (especially corporate speech and commercial speech); laws government lobbying; government regulation of communication with investors (both stockholders and bondholders); invasion of privacy; product liability; and intellectual property laws (copyright, trademarks, service marks). (adapted from the Commission on Public Relations Education’s recommendations in Educating for Complexity, October 2012, p. 12).
    *“Crisis communication. In this area, students should learn about the types of crises, stages of crisis management, crisis planning and reputation management, principles for crisis communication and crisis communication case studies,” especially the legal and ethical dimensions (adapted from the Commission on Public Relations Education’s recommendations in Educating for Complexity, October 2012, p. 12).
    *“Risk communication. Students should become familiar with models of risk communication; communication about risks, including natural hazards, environmental issues, food, health, safety, occupational hazards, consumer products, financial investments and terrorism; different responses to risk by diverse publics; and laws and government regulations that mandate organizational risk communication,” including especially the ethical dimensions (adapted from the Commission on Public Relations Education’s recommendations in Educating for Complexity, October 2012, p. 12).

    Specific Topics Covered by Course (may or may not mirror textbook[s]):
    *National and international intellectual property law (copyright, trademark, patent)
    *National and international libel law
    *National and international privacy law
    *National and international advertising law/regulation
    *National and international public relations law/regulation
    *Public relations ethics
    *Advertising ethics
    *Crisis communication (crisis communication also is covered in both the Communication Strategies and Media Relations Management courses)

    Substantive Rationale: Commission on Public Relations Education in its Educating for Complexity recommendations (October 2012), included in its overall conclusions about expectations of professional master’s degree programs in public relations that they include, “an understanding of the role of communication in society and the ethical challenges of global public relations” (p. 5), “improved critical thinking and problem solving skills” (p. 6), and “cutting-edge communication management abilities” (p. 6).
    Commission on Public Relations Education in its Educating for Complexity recommendations (October 2012), included in its overall conclusions about expectations of academically-oriented master’s degree programs in public relations that they include: “Thorough knowledge of public relations theories and principles” (p. 6), “advanced critical thinking skills” (p. 6), “Skills to teach undergraduate public relations” (p. 6), and “Preparation to enter and succeed in public relations doctoral programs” (p. 6).
    Commission on Public Relations Education in its Educating for Complexity recommendations (October 2012) more specifically said, “Participants reaffirmed the need for a mastery of language in oral and written form and agreed that a master’s degree curriculum needed to include instruction in the skills of...ethical decision-making....Even the most recommended corollary courses outside of public relations had a management component:...mass communication law....” (p. 9)
    Commission on Public Relations Education in its Educating for Complexity recommendations (October 2012) also concluded that “employers suggested that they usually hired people who understood the management of public relations and not just the tactics of public relations....Advanced positions in public relations involved setting strategy based on an understanding of client needs, the client’s competition and the specific business settings....[E]mployers emphasized business knowledge. They also were less concerned about public relations knowledge and skills than they were about the individual traits of potential hires, such as critical thinking ability, intellectual capability and curiosity....They suggested making the [master’s degree] programs rigorous and selective.”
    Commission on Public Relations Education in its Educating for Complexity recommendations (October 2012) recommended that a public relations master’s degree’s core curriculum include “*Strategic public relations management *Basic business principles and processes...*Ethics” (p. 12).
    Commission on Public Relations Education in its Educating for Complexity recommendations (October 2012) recommended that a public relations master’s degree’s curriculum also include “Ethical issues....Legal issues affecting the practice of public relations.” (p. 12).


    7. Major Course: Research Methods and Applications

    Course Description: This course is designed for students to learn the principles and processes of social scientific research methods (both quantitative and qualitative); to become acquainted with the major social scientific research methods (both quantitative and qualitative) used by mass communication scholars; to learn how to social scientifically test and refine mass communication theories; to design social scientific research; and to begin thinking about which research methods is/are of particular interest and relevance to students for their own research.

    Possible Textbook(s) and/or Other instructional materials:

    Choose one:
    Mass Media Research: An Introduction, 10th ed., by Roger Wimmer & Joseph R. Dominick (Cengage Learning/Wadsworth, 2013, 496pp, $179.95).

    Media and Communication Research Methods: An Introduction, by Anders Hansen and David Manchin (Palgrave Macmillan, 2013, 328pp, $30)

    Research Methods in Communication, 2nd Ed., edited by Shuhua Zhou and William David Sloan (Vision Press, 2011, 432pp., $43.95).

    A Handbook of Media and Communication Research: Qualitative and Quantitative Methodologies, 2nd Ed., edited by Klaus Bruhn Jensen (Routledge, 2011, 448pp, $41.95).

    Straight Talk about Communication Research Methods, Second Ed., by Christine S. Davis, Heather L. Powell Gallardo and Kenneth L. Lachlan (Kendall Hunt, 2013, $94.45)

    Supplemental books:
    Qualitative Research Methods for Media Studies, by Bonnie Brennan (Routledge, 2012, 248pp, $49.95)

    Qualitative Communication Research Methods, 3rd Ed., by Thomas R. Lindlof and Bryan C. Taylor (SAGE, 2010, 400pp, $81)

    Specific Course Objectives:
    *Understand the differences between theoretical and applied research, compare and contrast them, assess correctly when one or both are appropriate for problem-solving.
    *Understand the theory development process through using research method(s) to test hypotheses, thus building, refining, and even sometimes rejecting theories.
    *Develop skills, including but not limited to decision-making,to manage research in public relations.
    *Develop abilities to assess the appropriateness of choosing, and be able to apply, data measurement techniques.
    *Ability to discern actual and possible ethical concerns in public relations research and take appropriate steps to minimize or eliminate ethical concerns.
    *Understanding of differences in descriptive and inferential statistical analysis, if and when to apply descriptive and/or inferential statistical tools.
    *Applicable knowledge of at least major qualitative research methods: historical, cultural/critical, case studies, social scientific in-depth interviews, observation/ethnography, open-ended question surveys, ethical analysis, etc.
    *Applicable knowledge of at least major quantitative research methods: closed-ended question surveys, polls, laboratory experiments, field experiments, etc., including but not limited to random, universe, and purposive samples.
    *Understanding of and ability to apply techniques to increase internal validity, external validity and reliability of quantitative research methods and applicable equivalent goals in qualitative research methods.

    Specific Topics Covered by Course (may or may not mirror textbook[s]):
    *Content and textual analysis
    *Surveys and polls
    *Controlled/lab and field experiments
    *Depth interviews
    *Ethnography
    *Case studies
    *Legal research
    *Ethics research
    *Historical research

    Substantive Rationale: Commission on Public Relations Education in its Educating for Complexity recommendations (October 2012), included in its overall conclusions about expectations of professional master’s degree programs in public relations that they include, “improved critical thinking and problem solving skills” (p. 6), “social science research and evaluation knowledge and skills” (p. 6), and “cutting-edge communication management abilities” (p. 6).
    Commission on Public Relations Education in its Educating for Complexity recommendations (October 2012), included in its overall conclusions about expectations of academically-oriented master’s degree programs in public relations that they include: “advanced critical thinking skills” (p. 6), “social science research skills to test new theories” (p. 6), “Skills to work in applied public relations research” (p. 6), “Skills to teach undergraduate public relations” (p. 6), and “Preparation to enter and succeed in public relations doctoral programs” (p. 6).
    Commission on Public Relations Education in its Educating for Complexity recommendations (October 2012) more specifically said, “Participants reaffirmed the need for a mastery of language in oral and written form and agreed that a master’s degree curriculum needed to include instruction in the skills of...research....” (p. 9)
    Commission on Public Relations Education in its Educating for Complexity recommendations (October 2012) also concluded that “employers suggested that they usually hired people who understood the management of public relations and not just the tactics of public relations....Advanced positions in public relations involved setting strategy based on an understanding of client needs, the client’s competition and the specific business settings....[E]mployers emphasized business knowledge. They also were less concerned about public relations knowledge and skills than they were about the individual traits of potential hires, such as critical thinking ability, intellectual capability and curiosity....They suggested making the [master’s degree] programs rigorous and selective.”
    Commission on Public Relations Education in its Educating for Complexity recommendations (October 2012) recommended that a public relations master’s degree’s core curriculum include: “*Communication/public relations theory and research methods” (p. 12).



    8. Elective Course: Data Analysis and Public Opinion

    Course Description: This course fully explores the nature and measurement of public opinion, especially in the context of the reputations/images of countries (such as China), ideologies, corporations and other organizations, technologies, and various products and services. Students will examine the roles of social media, public diplomacy (including “soft power”), corporate communications, citizens’ consumption of domestic and foreign mass media, and globalization. Students will also study the acquisition, analysis, and ethics of public opinion data, and measuring the effects/effectiveness of public relations and other corporate communications.

    Possible Textbook(s) and/or Other instructional materials:

    Public Relations Research book:
    Primer of Public Relations Research, 2nd Edition, by Don W. Stacks (Guilford Press, 2010, 367pp, $59.00).

    Books on Reputation/Image of China (choose one):
    Living with the Dragon: How the American Public Views the Rise of China, by Benjamin I. Page, Tao Xie, and Andrew J. Nathan (Columbia University Press, 2010; 232pp, $30)

    Shaping China’s Global Imagination: Branding Nations at the World Expo, by Jian Wang (Palgrave Macmillan, 2013, 228pp, $100.00)

    Chinese Public Opinion books (choose one or two):
    Blocked on Weibo: What Gets Suppressed on China’s Version of Twitter (And Why), by Jason Q. Ng (New Press, 2013, 240pp, $15.95)

    The Party Line: How the Media Dictates Public Opinion in Modern China, by Dong Young (Wiley, 2013, 256pp, $24.95)

    Communication, Public Opinion, and Globalization in Urban China, by Francis L.F. Lee, Chin-Chuan Lee, Mike Z. Yao, Tsan-Kuo Chang, Fen Jennifer Lin, and Chris Fei Shen (Routledge, 2013, 218pp, $125.00)

    Social Media in China: Supporting One Party Rule in a 2.0 World, by William Vogt (Long River, Press, 2012, 35pp, $4.95)

    China’s Censorship of the Internet and Social Media: The Human Toll and Trade, by the Congressional-Executive Commission on China (Create Space Independent Publishing Platform, 2012, 78pp, $16.95)

    The Power of the Internet in China: Citizen Activism Online, by Guobin Yang (Columbia University Press, 2011, 320pp, $24).



    General Course Objectives (adopted from Commission on Public Relations Education in its Educating for Complexity Recommendations, October 2012):
    *“Issues management. Topics should include identification of future issues that could affect an organization, research and analysis of those issues, consideration of various options for responding to the issues, development of an action plan for the best options, implementation of plans and evaluation of such plan’s effectiveness” (from the Commission on Public Relations Education in its Educating for Complexity recommendations, p. 13).
    *“Written and oral communication. Students should be able to develop strategic plans based on research, to write and present plans....” (from the Commission on Public Relations Education in its Educating for Complexity recommendations, p. 13).
    *“Critical thinking. This area should include the elements of reasoning involved in critical thinking, such as identification of purpose; the question at issue; assumptions, implications, and consequences; and information, concepts, conclusions and point of view” (from the Commission on Public Relations Education in its Educating for Complexity recommendations, p. 13).
    *“Persuasive communication techniques. Students should understand the historical roots of persuasion; theories about persuasive communication from disciplines such as social psychology; and concepts such as cognitive dissonance, selective attention and retention, ethos, pathos and logos, message sources (including credibility, charisma and control), message content and propaganda” (from the Commission on Public Relations Education in its Educating for Complexity recommendations, p. 13).

    Specific Topics Covered by Course (may or may not mirror textbook[s]):
    *Soft Power generally, soft power of China specifically
    *Countries as “brands” and “strategic narratives”
    *The big, favorable news stories: 2008 Olympics, 2010 World Expo Shanghai
    *Sensitive stories: Tibet, Tiananmen Square, SARS, Sichuan Earthquake
    *Chinese Communist Party propaganda, the public, and the news media (agenda-setting)
    *Nationalism in China and other countries
    *Chinese citizens’ domestic and foreign media use
    *Global opinions about globalization
    *Online public opinion: Wechat, Weibo, Facebook, YouTube, etc.
    *Relations (and public opinion about it) between China, USA, Russia, India, UK, and Japan
    *Measuring PR outcomes, and using measurement scales in PR
    *Research ethics
    *Content analysis, historical research, case studies, interviews, etc., as applied to PR
    *Survey methodology applied to PR
    *Controlled and field experiments applied to PR

    Substantive Rationale: Commission on Public Relations Education in its Educating for Complexity recommendations (October 2012), included in its overall conclusions about expectations of professional master’s degree programs in public relations that they include, “an understanding of the role of communication in society” (p. 5), “improved critical thinking and problem solving skills” (p. 6), “social science research and evaluation knowledge and skills” (p. 6), and “cutting-edge communication management abilities” (p. 6).
    Commission on Public Relations Education in its Educating for Complexity recommendations (October 2012), included in its overall conclusions about expectations of academically-oriented master’s degree programs in public relations that they include: “Thorough knowledge of public relations theories and principles” (p. 6), “advanced critical thinking skills” (p. 6), “social science research skills to test new theories” (p. 6), “Skills to work in applied public relations research” (p. 6), “Skills to teach undergraduate public relations” (p. 6), and “Preparation to enter and succeed in public relations doctoral programs” (p. 6).
    Commission on Public Relations Education in its Educating for Complexity recommendations (October 2012) more specifically said, “Participants reaffirmed the need for a mastery of language in oral and written form and agreed that a master’s degree curriculum needed to include instruction in the skills of...issues management and research....” (p. 9)
    Commission on Public Relations Education in its Educating for Complexity recommendations (October 2012) also concluded that “employers suggested that they usually hired people who understood the management of public relations and not just the tactics of public relations....Advanced positions in public relations involved setting strategy based on an understanding of client needs, the client’s competition and the specific business settings....[E]mployers emphasized business knowledge. They also were less concerned about public relations knowledge and skills than they were about the individual traits of potential hires, such as critical thinking ability, intellectual capability and curiosity....They suggested making the [master’s degree] programs rigorous and selective.”
    Commission on Public Relations Education in its Educating for Complexity recommendations (October 2012) recommended that a public relations master’s degree’s core curriculum include “*Strategic public relations management....*Global influences on the practice of public relations” (p. 12).


    9. Elective Course: Comparative Media Systems

    Course Description: Students will explore and analyze media systems in various countries around the world, including China’s. Students will learn about the political, legal, historical, economic, cultural/religious, and professional contexts for news media and other mass media in the respective countries, and the relationships between those contexts and the countries’ media systems. Students will compare/contrast media systems and critique theories of media systems.

    Possible Textbook(s) and/or Other instructional materials (choose two):

    Comparing Media Systems Beyond the Western World, by Daniel C. Hallin and Paolo Mancini (Cambridge University Press, 2011; 356 pp, $29.99)

    Comparing Media Systems: Three Models of Media and Politics, by Daniel C. Hallin and Paolo Mancini (Cambridge University Press, 2004; 360pp, $35.99).

    Comparative Media Systems: European and Global Perspectives, edited by Boguslawa Dobekostrowska, Michal Glowacki, Karol Jakubowicz, and Miklos Sukosd (Central European University Press, 2009; 304pp, $50).

    The Handbook of Global Media Research, edited by Ingrid Volkmer (Wiley-Blackwell, 2012; 572pp, $205.95).

    The Handbook of Global Online Journalism, edited by Eugenia Siapera and Andreas Veglis (Wiley-Blackwell, 2012; 528pp, $200.95).

    Course Objectives (adapted from Commission on Public Relations Education in its Educating for Complexity Recommendations, October 2012):
    *Understanding reasons for varying names & roles of journalism, advertising, and other media content in different parts of the world.
    *Understanding how social, economic, political and cultural dimensions influence how journalism, advertising, and other media professions/skills practiced.
    *Understanding how journalism, advertising, and other media content skills are practiced and studied in different parts of the world and the differences and similarities that exist.
    *Having knowledge of major global, international, intercultural, and multi-cultural theories, approaches and schools of thought developed in Europe, the Americas, Asia, and Australia.
    *Appreciating how cultural distinctions and socio-economic and political particularities influence media practices in different regions and countries throughout the world.
    *Recognizing that social, political, economic, and cultural factors may alter media practices, even within one country.
    *Appreciating how advanced global and international media theories can be used and applied in strategic decision-making.
    *Appreciating cross-cultural and intercultural communication influences, globally, on media.
    *Understanding media-oriented relationship-building and relationship management across national and regional borders.
    *“Critical thinking. This area should include the elements of reasoning involved in critical thinking, such as identification of purpose; the question at issue; assumptions, implications, and consequences; and information, concepts, conclusions and point of view” (from the Commission on Public Relations Education in its Educating for Complexity recommendations, p. 13).

    Specific Topics Covered by Course (may or may not mirror textbook[s]):
    *Media systems in various countries around the world, including China’s.
    *Hallin & Mancini’s three models of Western media: Polarized Pluralist, Democratic Corporatist, and Liberal, replacing older models such as Siebert et al’s Four Theories of the Press.
    *Role of globalization and homogenization in various media systems
    *Political, legal, historical, economic, cultural/religious, and professional contexts for news media and other mass media in multiple countries, and the relationships between those contexts and the countries’ media systems
    *Comparing/contrasting media systems and critique theories of media systems.

    Substantive Rationale: Commission on Public Relations Education in its Educating for Complexity recommendations (October 2012), included in its overall conclusions about expectations of professional master’s degree programs in public relations that they include, “An appreciation for the importance of globalization” (p. 5), “an understanding of the role of communication in society and the ethical challenges of global public relations” (p. 5), and “improved critical thinking and problem solving skills” (p. 6).
    Commission on Public Relations Education in its Educating for Complexity recommendations (October 2012), included in its overall conclusions about expectations of academically-oriented master’s degree programs in public relations that they include: “advanced critical thinking skills” (p. 6), “Skills to teach undergraduate public relations” (p. 6), and “Preparation to enter and succeed in public relations doctoral programs” (p. 6).
    Commission on Public Relations Education in its Educating for Complexity recommendations (October 2012) also concluded that “employers suggested that they usually hired people who understood the management of public relations and not just the tactics o


    fees


    Tuition Fee
    Master RMB 23,000 pre year
    RMB 46,000 in total (About $ 8,435)
    Accommodation Fee
    SISU Guesthouse
    Double Room RMB 75 to RMB 95
    Single Room RMB 130 to RMB 165
    SISU Hotel
    Double Room RMB 75 to RMB 80
    Single Room RMB 120 to RMB 130
    Foreign Experts’ Building
    Double Room RMB 60
    Single Room RMB 100
    Jinjiang Inn (Hongkou Football Stadium)
    Double Room RMB 85
    Single Room RMB 160
    International Students Dormitory
    Double Room RMB 50
    Single Room RMB 100
    Other Fees
    Application Fee RMB 450 to RMB 810
    Service Fee USD 50
    Living Expense RMB 2,400 to RMB 3,000
- How Much Scholarship Cover
Admission Only
- You Need Pay After Got Scholarship (RMB)
  • Tuition:  23,000 / Year
  • Accommodation: 750 to 1200 RMB per month
  • Living Expense: 600 to 3000 RMB per month
- Requirement

Applicants shall be Non-Chinese citizens with reliable financial support and custody who are university graduates with bachelor’s degree and in good health.

English Language Proficiency

Applicants must have a good command of English, with one of the following: TOEFL IBT (internet based) test result of at least 80 points, TOEFL (computer based) test result of at least 213 points, TOEFL (paper based) test result of at least 550 points, or IELTS test result of at least 6.0. This requirement does not apply to an applicant who has studied for at least two years at, or received a degree from an English speaking high school, college, or university.

Applicants with IELTS between 4.5 and 6.0 or equivalent may be admitted conditionally. Conditional students will be required to pass an Entrance Examination in English.

- Application Documents

1. Application Form

Please upload your finished application form here.

2. Photocopy of valid passport


3. 4 passport photos (in size of 5cm * 4cm)


4. Diploma and academic record in original or notarized copy in English or Chinese


5. Personal statement in English


6. Research abilities

A summary list and abstract of each published paper, research project, or any other materials that certify your research abilities.

7. Two Letters of Recommendation

Two original recommendation letters from a professor or associate professor in English or Chinese.

8. English Test Proficiency

TOEFL / IELTS certificate or a statement of certification from the institution awarding your most recent degree confirming that the language of instruction was in English.

9. Note

In certain cases, SISU may require applicants to submit some additional materials.

  • Step 1: Click "Apply Now" button below and pay scholarship service fee.

  • Step 2: Wait for the payment confirmation, then provide documents guidance. (including the application form)

  • Step 3: Submit documents and wait for result and admission documents (including admission letter, visa letter)
The info on this website is for reference only, university/program/scholarship are to be confirmed per each applicant, before application.
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